Where Web Design is Going in 2019

Ryan Picardal
By Ryan Picardal

As technology continues to evolve, trends in web design will come and go as well. Long gone are the traditional hero sections and three columned points of emphasis that follows, as more abstract and out of the box web designs are becoming prevalent year by year. Time will only tell if these trends will become the new standard in modern-day web design. Unique web designs draw more attention to the eye and are more appealing to the general audience. Here are some web design trends that we’ll likely be seeing more of in 2019:

Unique Scrolling Experiences

With web design experiences becoming more and more mobile-focused, swipe-based gestures are becoming the wave of the future, and are starting to become incorporated into desktop-oriented websites. This leads to more horizontal scrolling experiences that translate well for both desktop, tablet, and mobile interfaces. Horizontal scrolling is more common on tablets and mobile screens; it definitely leaves an impression on a user since the internet primarily relies on vertical-scrolling. Horizontal web layouts also give the user the opportunity to process information in smaller amounts. Websites that display multiple images or show small excerpts of information are ideal for horizontal scrolling. These are examples of sites that utilize a unique scrolling experience for the user:

Source: Reputation Squad

 

Source: Ratscheider

CRO_Checkout_Process

Original & Creative Illustrations

Why do kids love cartoons so much? Why do most children’s books have illustrations in them? That’s because cartoons and illustrations are easy for children to understand as they develop learning skills. In a sense, this same idea applies to this latest web design trend where bold headlines are accompanied with correlating illustrations. These tend to work in tandem together to help illustrate a certain point or topic for users to understand. Think of it as a way for the company to sum up the purpose of their product/service or elaborate on their brand through images. Here are some examples of websites that use illustration to help emphasize their brand:

Source: MailChimp

 

Source: Lyft

 

Source: Slack

 

Source: Every Last Drop UK

Organic Shapes

There are countless websites in the digital world that follow a generic look and feel, with a lot of straight lines and grid-like structures. However, there are also sites that break away from the mold and utilize more organic shapes and structures to draw more attention. This is something that has been showing up in more sites in 2018, and will look to become more widespread in the upcoming year. These sites demonstrate the use of organic shapes along with vibrant colors to appeal to the user’s eyes:

Source: Netlify

 

Source: Elje Group

The Overlapping Phenomenon Continues

Asymmetrical design has become more widespread over the past few years, and there’s no sign of it stopping in 2019. Text overlapping images, as images overlap shapes – it goes against traditional web design norms from a decade ago, but it seems like it’s becoming the new standard in website design. Overlapping images and text over one another appeals to users and creates contrast when trying to accentuate a topic on a website. Here are some examples of websites that display the trendy overlapping phenomenon:

Source: AgenceMe

 

Source: Power Digital Marketing

Conclusion

New web design techniques and layouts are constantly emerging; it’s important for web designers to never be complacent in order to stay relevant in today’s day and age. Dive into your new year projects by putting these creative design trends to use in 2019.

CRO_Assessment

 

Learn More Here

Ryan Picardal is a Web Designer at Power Digital Marketing. Born and raised in San Diego, CA, Ryan has a multidisciplinary background in creative work, graduating from San Diego State University with a B.A. in Multimedia and a minor in Marketing. His work stretches across a variety of mediums, including UI/UX design, graphic design, illustration, creative direction, and print.